Stability of Attachment Style in Adolescence: An Empirical Test of Alternative Developmental Processes

Jason D. Jones, R. Chris Fraley, Katherine B. Ehrlich, Jessica A. Stern, C. W. Lejuez, Phillip R. Shaver, Jude Cassidy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Few studies have examined stability and change in attachment during adolescence. This 5-year longitudinal study (a) examined whether prototype or revisionist developmental dynamics better characterized patterns of stability and change in adolescent attachment (at T1, N = 176; Mage = 14.0 years, SD = 0.9), (b) tested potential moderators of prototype-like attachment stability, and (c) compared attachment stability in adolescence to stability in adulthood. The results supported the prototype model, which assumes that there is a stable, enduring factor underlying stability and change in attachment. Exploratory moderation analyses revealed that family conflict, parental separation or divorce, minority status, and male sex might undermine the prototype-like stability of adolescent attachment. Stability of attachment was lower in adolescence relative to adulthood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)871-880
Number of pages10
JournalChild development
Volume89
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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