Speech errors reflect the phonotactic constraints in recently spoken syllables, but not in recently heard syllables

Jill A. Warker, Ye Xu, Gary S. Dell, Cynthia Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adults rapidly learn phonotactic constraints from brief production or perception experience. Three experiments asked whether this learning is modality-specific, occurring separately in production and perception, or whether perception transfers to production. Participant pairs took turns repeating syllables in which particular consonants were restricted to particular syllable positions. Speakers' errors reflected learning of the constraints present in the sequences they produced, regardless of whether their partner produced syllables with the same constraints, or opposing constraints. Although partial transfer could be induced (Experiment 3), simply hearing and encoding syllables produced by others did not affect speech production to the extent that error patterns were altered. Learning of new phonotactic constraints was predominantly restricted to the modality in which those constraints were experienced.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-96
Number of pages16
JournalCognition
Volume112
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

Keywords

  • Perception
  • Phonotactic learning
  • Production
  • Speech errors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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