Special Session Summary: Do You Remember How Much It Costs? Perspectives on Encoding and Memory For Price Information

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The objective of this session was to examine how consumers encode and remember price information. Specifically, the primary objective of the session was to bring out the importance of this hitherto neglected area of research to consumer research and practice. Though some research has focused on price encoding and memory (Mazumdar and Monroe, 1990), it remains an under-researched area. Further, research of this nature would also have implications for several areas of pricing research as well as several other areas of consumer research such as nutritional information and more generally, product information. While past consumer research has examined a host of issues such as ways in which price information is used to make global judgments of product quality and value, the actual encoding of price remains an under-researched area. However, such research on price encoding and memory has important implications in understanding how price information is used in global judgments and in understanding the relationship of price with perceived quality and value.

The session included work in the area of price encoding and memory that provided a sense of the breadth of issues and implications involved in this area of research. Specifically, the session aimed to (i) provide a background of past research and what we know to date, (ii) provide a view of current and potential research in the area, (iii) discuss specific substantive and methodological issues that are central to such research, and (iv) discuss the implications of research on encoding and memory for other areas of pricing research such as on perceived quality and value. Therefore, the session included four papers on (i) our knowledge of the area to date and future research avenues and implications for other areas of pricing research, (ii) substantive issues in the study of price encoding and memory, and (iii) methodological issues in the study of price encoding and memory, respectively.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAsia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research
EditorsKineta Hung, Kent Monroe
Place of PublicationProvo, UT
PublisherAssociation for Consumer Research
Pages30-31
Volume3
StatePublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Costs
Pricing research
Consumer research
Perceived value
Perceived quality
Product value
Product quality
Product information

Cite this

Viswanathan, M. (1998). Special Session Summary: Do You Remember How Much It Costs? Perspectives on Encoding and Memory For Price Information. In K. Hung, & K. Monroe (Eds.), Asia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research (Vol. 3, pp. 30-31). Provo, UT: Association for Consumer Research.

Special Session Summary : Do You Remember How Much It Costs? Perspectives on Encoding and Memory For Price Information. / Viswanathan, Madhubalan.

Asia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research. ed. / Kineta Hung; Kent Monroe. Vol. 3 Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, 1998. p. 30-31.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Viswanathan, M 1998, Special Session Summary: Do You Remember How Much It Costs? Perspectives on Encoding and Memory For Price Information. in K Hung & K Monroe (eds), Asia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research. vol. 3, Association for Consumer Research, Provo, UT, pp. 30-31.
Viswanathan M. Special Session Summary: Do You Remember How Much It Costs? Perspectives on Encoding and Memory For Price Information. In Hung K, Monroe K, editors, Asia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research. Vol. 3. Provo, UT: Association for Consumer Research. 1998. p. 30-31
Viswanathan, Madhubalan. / Special Session Summary : Do You Remember How Much It Costs? Perspectives on Encoding and Memory For Price Information. Asia Pacific Advances in Consumer Research. editor / Kineta Hung ; Kent Monroe. Vol. 3 Provo, UT : Association for Consumer Research, 1998. pp. 30-31
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