Spatial distribution measurement of particulate matter in a swine building using a 3-D multi-point sampler

Sheryll B. Jerez, Yuanhui Zhang, Xinlei Wang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Indoor measurements will be more meaningful for exposure and aerosol transport studies if the optimum location for the sampler is selected and representative sample is collected. In animal buildings, many difficulties exist in making representative measurements of particle concentration since it is never uniformly distributed within the ventilated airspace due to particle inertia, gravitational settling, and non-uniform flow field. Thus, determining the optimum location for the sampler necessitates the measurement of particle concentration at multiple locations. In this paper, results of the preliminary study on the effect of sampler orientation on the measured dust concentration and particle size distribution were presented. This preliminary test was essential to be able to properly design a sampler for the multipoint dust concentration measurement. The surrounding air velocity and orientation of the sampler had a significant effect on the measured dust concentration and MMD but not on the GSD and GMD of the samples. The sampler which was oriented vertically had lower dust concentration than those samplers oriented at 45 and 0° from the horizontal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2005 ASAE Annual International Meeting
StatePublished - 2005
Event2005 ASAE Annual International Meeting - Tampa, FL, United States
Duration: Jul 17 2005Jul 20 2005

Other

Other2005 ASAE Annual International Meeting
CountryUnited States
CityTampa, FL
Period7/17/057/20/05

Keywords

  • Coulter counter
  • Dust spatial distribution
  • Multi-point sampler
  • Total suspended particulate matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Bioengineering

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