Spatial and activity patterns of black rat snakes (Elaphe obsoleta) from radiotelemetry and recapture data

P. J. Weatherhead, D. J. Hoysak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In E Ontario, snakes generally remained in their home ranges (which usually did not include the snakes' hibernating sites) until late September or early October and then moved directly to the communal hibernacula and went below ground. Emergence occurred in late April and early May and most snakes returned to their home ranges without delay. Home ranges of males averaged >3 times the size of those of females. Males also moved more often and farther than females. Males were captured more frequently than females during the mating season, although they were most active later in the summer. The peak in captures may be due to males speading more time in open areas during the breeding season because doing so somehow increases their success in locating females. Activity and movement patterns follow quite different patterns in males and females. Male activity may be determined by thermoregulatory factors while females may be affected more by reproduction. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-468
Number of pages6
JournalCanadian journal of zoology
Volume67
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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