Sorption of E. coli from liquid swine manure in natural and artificial soils

Jorge Alberto Guzman Jaimes, Garey Fox, Chad Penn

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Animal waste applications in agricultural lands can contribute microbial contamination to water bodies. After manure application, Escherichia Coli (E. coli) can be transported by surface runoff and infiltration or can be retained in soils by its filter capacity. The soil filter capacity is a dynamic function of the physical-chemical properties of the soil, effluent composition and bacteria properties. In this study, E. coli isotherms were determined after mixing natural and artificial soils with manure effluents at different dilution ratios and decanting the clay particles by centrifugation. Two natural soils (e.g., loamy sand and sandy loam) and seven artificial soils were used with different clay (e.g., kaolinite: KGa-1) and organic matter (e.g., Sphagnum peat moss) content. In addition, the organic matter in the natural soils was removed using a hydrogen peroxide reagent. Sorption data fit a nonlinear Freundlich isotherm with a coefficient of determination, R2, higher than 0.93 except for the pure sand and natural soils after the organic matter was removed (e.g., R2 was higher than 0.84). Sorption data suggested that the presence of organic matter favored E. coli sorption in soils with clay contents lower than 10%. Sorption equations based on clay content without considering the effect of organic matter may underestimate E. coli sorption for varying solution E. coli concentrations. A general equation to estimate the Freundlich coefficients were obtained from the experiments based on the natural logarithms of clay content for total carbon content in the range of 0 to 2.1%. These equations are intended to be valuable in estimating E. coli sorption in manure-amended soils for improved modeling of E. coli fate and transport in soils.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009
Pages3094-3104
Number of pages11
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009
Externally publishedYes
EventAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009 - Reno, NV, United States
Duration: Jun 21 2009Jun 24 2009

Publication series

NameAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009
Volume5

Other

OtherAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009
CountryUnited States
CityReno, NV
Period6/21/096/24/09

Fingerprint

Manure
pig manure
sorption
Swine
Soil
Escherichia coli
liquids
soil organic matter
soil
clay
Sphagnopsida
Sphagnum
animal manures
effluents
loamy sand soils
animal wastes
microbial contamination
kaolinite
Kaolin
soil chemical properties

Keywords

  • Bacterial sorption
  • Escherichia coli
  • Freundlich isotherms
  • Soil pathogen transport

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Guzman Jaimes, J. A., Fox, G., & Penn, C. (2009). Sorption of E. coli from liquid swine manure in natural and artificial soils. In American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009 (pp. 3094-3104). (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009; Vol. 5).

Sorption of E. coli from liquid swine manure in natural and artificial soils. / Guzman Jaimes, Jorge Alberto; Fox, Garey; Penn, Chad.

American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009. 2009. p. 3094-3104 (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009; Vol. 5).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Guzman Jaimes, JA, Fox, G & Penn, C 2009, Sorption of E. coli from liquid swine manure in natural and artificial soils. in American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009, vol. 5, pp. 3094-3104, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, Reno, NV, United States, 6/21/09.
Guzman Jaimes JA, Fox G, Penn C. Sorption of E. coli from liquid swine manure in natural and artificial soils. In American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009. 2009. p. 3094-3104. (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009).
Guzman Jaimes, Jorge Alberto ; Fox, Garey ; Penn, Chad. / Sorption of E. coli from liquid swine manure in natural and artificial soils. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009. 2009. pp. 3094-3104 (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009).
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