Solving the reconfigurable design problem for multiability with application to robotic systems

Jeffrey D. Arena, James Allison

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Systems that can be reconfigured are valuable in situations where a single artifact must perform several different functions well, and are especially important in cases where system demands are not known a priori. Design of reconfigurable systems present unique challenges compared to fixed system design. Increasing reconfigurable capability improves system utility, but also increases system complexity and cost. In this article a new design strategy is presented for the design of reconfigurable systems for multiability. This study is limited to systems where all system functions are known a priori, and only continuous means of reconfiguration are considered. Designing such a system requires determination of (1) what system features should be reconfigurable, and (2) what should the range of reconfigurability of these features be. The new design strategy is illustrated using a reconfigurable delta robot, which is a parallel manipulator that can be adapted to perform a variety of manufacturing operations. In this case study the tradeoff between end effector stiffness and speed is considered over two separate manipulation tasks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication40th Design Automation Conference
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
ISBN (Electronic)9780791846322
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
EventASME 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2014 - Buffalo, United States
Duration: Aug 17 2014Aug 20 2014

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
Volume2B

Other

OtherASME 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2014
CountryUnited States
CityBuffalo
Period8/17/148/20/14

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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  • Cite this

    Arena, J. D., & Allison, J. (2014). Solving the reconfigurable design problem for multiability with application to robotic systems. In 40th Design Automation Conference (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 2B). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC201435314