Soluble fiber dextrin and soluble corn fiber supplementation modify indices of health in cecum and colon of sprague-dawley rats

Brenda K. Knapp, Laura L. Bauer, Kelly S. Swanson, Kelly A. Tappenden, George C. Fahey, Maria R.C. de Godoy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate health outcomes resulting from dietary supplementation of novel, low-digestible carbohydrates in the cecum and colon of Sprague-Dawley rats randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups for 21 days: 5% cellulose (Control), Pectin, soluble fiber dextrin (SFD), or soluble corn fiber (SCF). Rats fed Pectin had a higher average daily food intake, but no differences in final body weights or rates of weight gain among treatments were observed. No differences were observed in total short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) or branched-chain fatty acid (BCFA) concentrations in the cecum and colon of rats fed either SFD or SCF. The SFD and SCF treatments increased cecal propionate and decreased butyrate concentrations compared to Control or Pectin. Pectin resulted in increased BCFA in the cecum and colon. Supplementation of SFD and SCF had no effect on cecal microbial populations compared to Control. Consumption of SFD and SCF increased total and empty cecal weight but not colon weight. Gut histomorphology was positively affected by SFD and SCF. Increased crypt depth, goblet cell numbers, and acidic mucin were observed in both the cecum and colon of rats supplemented with SFD, SCF, and Pectin. These novel, low-digestible carbohydrates appear to be beneficial in modulating indices of hindgut morphology when supplemented in the diet of the rat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-410
Number of pages15
JournalNutrients
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 4 2013

Keywords

  • Cecal fermentation
  • Histomorphology
  • Soluble corn fiber
  • Soluble fiber dextrin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Soluble fiber dextrin and soluble corn fiber supplementation modify indices of health in cecum and colon of sprague-dawley rats'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this