Social change movements and the struggle over meaning-making: A case study of domestic violence narratives

Amy Lehrner, Nicole E. Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Social movement theorists have emphasized the important role of meaning-making for social change movements (e.g., D. A. Snow and R. D. Benford, 1992, In: A. D. Morris & C. M. Mueller (Eds.) Frontiers in social movement theory. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT, pp 133-155; C. M. Mueller, 1992, In: A. D. Morris & C. M. Mueller (Eds.) Frontiers in social movement theory. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT, pp 3-26). Using the domestic violence movement as a case study, this study undertakes a close analysis of advocates' narratives about the phenomenon of domestic violence. This analysis sheds light on the current status of the movement as a social change movement attempting to promote alternative understandings of domestic violence as a social, rather than individual, problem. Study findings provide some evidence that the domestic violence movement has become increasingly de-politicized by documenting a range of narratives that convey an apolitical, degendered, individual-level analysis of domestic violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)220-234
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican journal of community psychology
Volume42
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

Keywords

  • Battered women
  • Domestic violence movement
  • Social movements
  • Social problems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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