Social biases toward children with speech and language impairments: A correlative causal model of language limitations

Mabel L. Rice, Pamela A. Hadley, Amy L. Alexander

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study explores adults' attitudes toward children with limited linguistic competency. Four groups of adult judges participated in this study: kindergarten teachers, women matched for age and education level with the teachers, undergraduate college students, and speech-language pathologists. The judges listened to audiotaped samples of preschool children's speech. Two triads of children were formed, matched for age, gender, and intelligence, but differing in communication abilities. The adults responded to questionnaire items addressing child attributes (e.g., intelligence, social maturity) and parental attributes (e.g., education level, SES). Systematic biases were revealed toward children with limited communication abilities. The biases are interpreted as reflective of adults' expectations for children's language.It is argued that adults call upon a correlative causal model of language acquisition to interpret individual differences in children's language abilities. Negative social and academic consequences of such misinterpretations are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-471
Number of pages27
JournalApplied Psycholinguistics
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1993
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • General Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Social biases toward children with speech and language impairments: A correlative causal model of language limitations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this