Smoothed particle hydrodynamics continuous boundary force method for Navier-Stokes equations subject to a Robin boundary condition

Wenxiao Pan, Jie Bao, Alexandre M. Tartakovsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A Robin boundary condition for the Navier-Stokes equations is used to model slip conditions at the fluid-solid boundaries. A novel continuous boundary force (CBF) method is proposed for solving the Navier-Stokes equations subject to the Robin boundary condition. In the CBF method, the Robin boundary condition is replaced by the homogeneous Neumann boundary condition and a volumetric force term added to the momentum conservation equation. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method is used to solve the resulting Navier-Stokes equations. We present solutions for two- and three-dimensional flows subject to various forms of the Robin boundary condition in domains bounded by flat and curved boundaries. The numerical accuracy and convergence are examined through comparison of the SPH-CBF results with the solutions of finite difference or finite-element method. Considering the no-slip boundary condition as a special case of the slip boundary condition, we demonstrate that the SPH-CBF method accurately describes both the no-slip and slip conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-259
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Computational Physics
Volume259
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Navier-Stokes equations
  • No-slip boundary condition
  • Robin boundary condition
  • Slip boundary condition
  • Smoothed particle hydrodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Numerical Analysis
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computational Mathematics
  • Applied Mathematics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Smoothed particle hydrodynamics continuous boundary force method for Navier-Stokes equations subject to a Robin boundary condition'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this