Situating Advice Response Theory in a Cultural and Relational Context: How Hispanic Adults Perceive Exercise Advice From Parents

Lisa M. Guntzviller, Ningxin Wang, Andrea Martinez Gonzalez, Chelsea L. Ratcliff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We analyzed how Hispanic participants in early adulthood (N = 275) responded to parental advice about physical activity. We tested and extended advice response theory (ART) by contextualizing ART predictions within the cultural, relational, and topical context of this study and by articulating the role of receptiveness in the model. Overall, ART predictions were supported: Participants were more likely to implement advice and rate it favorably when they perceived the advice was efficacious in solving the problem and did not threaten their positive face (i.e., insult or shame them). Positive facework ratings were also associated with better coping and impact on exercise. Participants’ open-ended advice descriptions revealed distinctions between messages rated low or high in efficacy and positive facework. Receptiveness mediated the influence of relational satisfaction and parent expertise ratings on advice evaluations and was directly and positively associated with all advice outcomes. We discuss implications for ART and intercultural research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)572-598
Number of pages27
JournalCommunication Research
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2020

Keywords

  • Hispanic
  • advice
  • exercise
  • interpersonal communication
  • parent-child communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication
  • Linguistics and Language

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