Single-bit re-encryption with applications to distributed proof systems

Nikita Borisov, Kazuhiro Minami

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We examine the implementation of the distributed proof system designed by Minami and Kotz [17]. We find that, although a high-level analysis shows that it preserves confidentiality, the implementation of the cryptographic primitives contains a covert channel that can leak information. Moreover, this channel is present with any traditional choice of public key encryption functions. To remedy this problem, we use the Goldwasser-Micali cryptosystem to implement single-bit re-encryption and show how to make it free of covert channels. We then extend the primitive to support commutative encryption as well. Using this primitive, we design a variant of the Minami-Kotz algorithm that not only is free of covert channels, but also has additional proving power over the original design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWPES'07 - Proceedings of the 2007 ACM Workshop on Privacy in Electronic Society
Pages48-55
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Event6th ACM Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society, WPES'07, Held in Association with the 14th ACM Computer and Communications Security Conference - Alexandria, VA, United States
Duration: Oct 29 2007Oct 29 2007

Publication series

NameWPES'07 - Proceedings of the 2007 ACM Workshop on Privacy in Electronic Society

Other

Other6th ACM Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society, WPES'07, Held in Association with the 14th ACM Computer and Communications Security Conference
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityAlexandria, VA
Period10/29/0710/29/07

Keywords

  • commutative encryption
  • covert channels
  • distributed proof systems
  • goldwasser-micali
  • re-encryption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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