Simulation-based analysis of network rules matching

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A common function in networking is to find “the best" match between a packet’s IP header and a list of matching rules, and to take some action based on the rule which is matched. This approach determines whether a packet transits a firewall or router and which interface is chosen for egress when it does, and whether a Network Address Translation transformation is applied. Considerable past research has optimized data structures and algorithms for rules-matching, under the operating assumption that with every specific application the best match is sought for a single IP flow, with a specified protocol, and specified source and destination IP and port numbers. This paper is motivated by a different scenario, in which we seek the simultaneous determination of the best matches for a bundle of flows. The flows are closely related as the bundle is a “contiguous" subset of the IP header space, meaning each flow draws in each dimension from the same range as other flows do in that same dimension. This specific problem arises in the design of tools that analyze the connectivity of networks. We consider here two algorithms for approaching this problem, which share the characteristic of generalizing the simulation of how devices typically classify a given flow. We study the behavior of these algorithms empirically, and find that the amortized cost of identifying the best matching rule in an ACL is typically measured in (at most) 10’s of micro-seconds on an ordinary laptop computer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSIGSIM-PADS 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages49-60
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781450367233
DOIs
StatePublished - May 29 2019
Event2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation, SIGSIM-PADS 2019 - Chicago, United States
Duration: Jun 3 2019Jun 5 2019

Publication series

NameSIGSIM-PADS 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation

Conference

Conference2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation, SIGSIM-PADS 2019
CountryUnited States
CityChicago
Period6/3/196/5/19

Fingerprint

Laptop computers
Simulation
Routers
Data structures
Bundle
Algorithms and Data Structures
Firewall
Router
Networking
Costs
Connectivity
Classify
Scenarios
Subset
Range of data
Design
Meaning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Modeling and Simulation

Cite this

Nicol, D. M. (2019). Simulation-based analysis of network rules matching. In SIGSIM-PADS 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation (pp. 49-60). (SIGSIM-PADS 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. https://doi.org/10.1145/3316480.3325519

Simulation-based analysis of network rules matching. / Nicol, David Malcolm.

SIGSIM-PADS 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2019. p. 49-60 (SIGSIM-PADS 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Nicol, DM 2019, Simulation-based analysis of network rules matching. in SIGSIM-PADS 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation. SIGSIM-PADS 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, pp. 49-60, 2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation, SIGSIM-PADS 2019, Chicago, United States, 6/3/19. https://doi.org/10.1145/3316480.3325519
Nicol DM. Simulation-based analysis of network rules matching. In SIGSIM-PADS 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. 2019. p. 49-60. (SIGSIM-PADS 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation). https://doi.org/10.1145/3316480.3325519
Nicol, David Malcolm. / Simulation-based analysis of network rules matching. SIGSIM-PADS 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2019. pp. 49-60 (SIGSIM-PADS 2019 - Proceedings of the 2019 ACM SIGSIM Conference on Principles of Advanced Discrete Simulation).
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