Si-C linked oligo(ethylene glycol) layers in silicon-based photonic crystals: Optimization for implantable optical materials

Kristopher A. Kilian, Till Böcking, Katharina Gaus, Michael Gal, J. Justin Gooding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Porous silicon has shown potential for various applications in biology and medicine, which require that the material (1) remain stable for the length of the intended application and (2) resist non-specific adsorption of proteins. Here we explore the efficacy of short oligo(ethylene glycol) moieties incorporated into organic layers via two separate strategies in achieving these aims. In the first strategy the porous silicon structure was modified in a single step via hydrosilylation of α-oligo(ethylene glycol)-ω-alkenes containing three or six ethylene glycol units. The second strategy employs two steps: (1) hydrosilylation of succinimidyl-10-undecenoate and (2) coupling of an amino hexa(ethylene glycol) species. The porous silicon photonic crystals modified by the two-step strategy displayed greater stability relative to the single step procedure when exposed to conditions of physiological temperature and pH. Both strategies produced layers that resist non-specific adsorption of proteins as determined with fluorescently labelled bovine serum albumin. The antifouling behaviour and greater stability to physiological conditions provided by this chemistry enhances the suitability of porous silicon for biomaterials applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3055-3062
Number of pages8
JournalBiomaterials
Volume28
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

Keywords

  • Oligo(ethylene glycol)
  • Photonic crystals
  • Porous silicon
  • Protein resistance
  • Self-assembled monolayers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Mechanics of Materials

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