"Show me" what you mean: Learning and design implications of eliciting gesture in student explanations

Robb Lindgren, Robert C. Wallon, David E. Brown, Nitasha Mathayas, Nathan Kimball

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper describes preliminary research conducted on how gestures affect the construction of student explanations of science phenomena. We examine the effect of asking middle school students to "show me" while they construct explanations of critical science topics such as heat transfer and the causes of seasons. Specifically we were interested in whether there were any apparent changes in students' inclusion of unobservable causal mechanisms (e.g., molecular interactions) that underlie observable phenomena such as how heat moves through a metal spoon. T o und erst and the see ffects, we coded for whet her explanations were more mechanistic following the "show me" prompts compared to their previous explanations. Results showed that elicitation of gesturing frequently led to increased attention to, and specification of, the critical mechanisms. We describe a few specific cases to illustrate the ways in which gesturing appeared to alter student reasoning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication12th International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2016
Subtitle of host publicationTransforming Learning, Empowering Learners, Proceedings
EditorsChee-Kit Looi, Joseph L. Polman, Peter Reimann, Ulrike Cress
PublisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Pages1014-1017
Number of pages4
Volume2
ISBN (Electronic)9780990355083
StatePublished - 2016
Event12th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: Transforming Learning, Empowering Learners, ICLS 2016 - Singapore, Singapore
Duration: Jun 20 2016Jun 24 2016

Other

Other12th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: Transforming Learning, Empowering Learners, ICLS 2016
CountrySingapore
CitySingapore
Period6/20/166/24/16

Keywords

  • Embodied learning
  • Explanations
  • Gestures
  • Science reasoning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Education

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