Short-chain fatty acids increase proglucagon and ornithine decarboxylase messenger RNAs after intestinal resection in rats

Kelly A. Tappenden, Alan B.R. Thomson, Gary E. Wild, Michael I. Mcburney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Intestinal adaptation is a complex physiological process that is not completely understood. Systemic administration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) has been shown to facilitate adaptation to small bowel resection; however the mechanisms underlying this phenomena are unknown. Methods: Forty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent an 80% jejunoileal resection and jugular catheterization. After surgery, rats were randomly assigned to receive standard total parenteral nutrition (TPN) or an isoenergetic, isonitrogenous TPN supplemented with SCFAs. On day 3 or 7 after surgery, ileal samples were removed for determination of mucosal wet weight, DNA, RNA, and protein concentrations. Total cellular RNA was extracted for use in Northern blot analysis to quantify proglucagon and ornithine decarboxylase messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Results: Total, mucosal, and submucosal weights were increased (p < .05) in the SCFA group both 3 and 7 days after surgery. Ileal DNA and RNA concentrations were increased (p < .05) in the SCFA group at both time points; however ileal protein concentration did not differ between groups until 7 days after resection. Levels of proglucagon and ornithine decarboxylase messenger RNAs were higher (p < .05) in the SCFA group at both time points. Conclusion: The upregulation of proglucagon and ornithine decarboxylase gene expression may be the mechanism by which SCFAs facilitate intestinal adaptation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-362
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Short-chain fatty acids increase proglucagon and ornithine decarboxylase messenger RNAs after intestinal resection in rats'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this