Shear stress-strain-time behaviour of clays

Gholamreza Mesri, A. Castro, E. Febres-Cordero, D. R. Shields

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Shear stress-strain-time models for soils were examined in terms of undrained triaxial compression tests, with pore water pressure measurement, using reconstituted specimens of kaolinite and Cucaracha shale. Multiple-step constant load and constant rate of deformation tests were performed. The testing variables included final equal all-round consolidation pressure (100-800 lb/in2), overconsolidation ratio (1-8) and the magnitude of the first load increment (20-82% in terms of shear stress level). Additional constant load test data reported in the literature were analysed. The parameters of an exponential stress-strain model were expressed and interpreted in terms of the parameters of the hyperbolic stress-strain model. The parameters of both models can be expressed in terms of the undrained modulus to undrained shear strength ratio Eu/su and the axial strain at failure εf. The creep parameter λ which controls time or strain rate effects was correlated with Eu/su. It appears that any soil has a potential total strain at any shear stress level, and that λ is directly related to the magnitude of the remaining strain. A large value of Eu/su means a small strain at any small time. Therefore as Eu/su increases, the remaining strain and thus λ increase. Alternative combinations of the hyperbolic stress-strain and either power strain-time or power strain-strain rate relationships are suggested as possible creep models for the analysis of field problems and interpretation of laboratory tests.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)537-552
Number of pages16
JournalGeotechnique
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1981

Fingerprint

shear stress
Shear stress
Clay
clay
strain rate
creep
overconsolidation
shear strength
kaolinite
consolidation
porewater
shale
Strain rate
soil
Loads (forces)
Creep
compression
Soils
parameter
Kaolinite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Mesri, G., Castro, A., Febres-Cordero, E., & Shields, D. R. (1981). Shear stress-strain-time behaviour of clays. Geotechnique, 31(4), 537-552. https://doi.org/10.1680/geot.1981.31.4.537

Shear stress-strain-time behaviour of clays. / Mesri, Gholamreza; Castro, A.; Febres-Cordero, E.; Shields, D. R.

In: Geotechnique, Vol. 31, No. 4, 01.12.1981, p. 537-552.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mesri, G, Castro, A, Febres-Cordero, E & Shields, DR 1981, 'Shear stress-strain-time behaviour of clays', Geotechnique, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 537-552. https://doi.org/10.1680/geot.1981.31.4.537
Mesri G, Castro A, Febres-Cordero E, Shields DR. Shear stress-strain-time behaviour of clays. Geotechnique. 1981 Dec 1;31(4):537-552. https://doi.org/10.1680/geot.1981.31.4.537
Mesri, Gholamreza ; Castro, A. ; Febres-Cordero, E. ; Shields, D. R. / Shear stress-strain-time behaviour of clays. In: Geotechnique. 1981 ; Vol. 31, No. 4. pp. 537-552.
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