Sex and racial/ethnic differences in sleep quality and its relationship with body weight status among US college students

Jaesin Sa, Tonya Samuel, Jean Philippe Chaput, Joon Chung, Diana S. Grigsby-Toussaint, Jounghee Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To examine sex and racial/ethnic differences in sleep quality and the association between sleep quality and body weight status among US college students. Participants: A nationally representative sample (N = 324,767) of college students from 2011 to 2015. Methods: A secondary data analysis of cross-sectional data. Results: Women showed poorer sleep quality (nights per week getting enough sleep to feel rested) than men (4.00 versus 4.34 days; p <.001). In both men and women, compared with non-Hispanic whites, racial/ethnic minorities showed lower sleep quality (p <.001). Compared with normal weight participants, overweight participants had poorer sleep quality (p =.007) among men, and both overweight (p =.004) and obese participants (p <.001) had lower sleep quality among women. Conclusions: Understanding sex and racial/ethnic sleep differences and the association between sleep and body weight status is important for colleges to promote college students’ healthy sleep.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)704-711
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume68
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • college students
  • differences
  • race/ethnicity
  • sex
  • sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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