Sensitivity studies for prediction of ultra-violet radiation in nonequilibrium hypersonic bow-shock waves

Iain D. Boyd, Wyatt D. Phillips, Deborah A. Levin

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Ultra-violet emissions radiated by nitric oxide and atomic oxygen are computed for hypersonic nouequilibrium flow conditions corresponding to the Bow-Shock Ultra-Violet-2 flight experiment. The flow field is analyzed using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Radiation is then estimated using a nonequilibrium radiation code. New results are presented that incorporate a number of recent physical and numerical models. Good agreement is obtained between flight data and predictions over a range of altitudes for both nitric oxide and atomic oxygen emissions. Sensitivity to a number of modeling assumptions of the nitric oxide emission predicted at the highest altitude condition is considered. It is found that the emission is very sensitive to the translational energy accommodation coefficient. It is also extremely sensitive to the free stream chemical composition assumed. By contrast, the high altitude emission is insensitive to dissociation and exchange reaction models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997
Externally publishedYes
Event35th Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, 1997 - Reno, United States
Duration: Jan 6 1997Jan 9 1997

Other

Other35th Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, 1997
CountryUnited States
CityReno
Period1/6/971/9/97

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Aerospace Engineering

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    Boyd, I. D., Phillips, W. D., & Levin, D. A. (1997). Sensitivity studies for prediction of ultra-violet radiation in nonequilibrium hypersonic bow-shock waves. Paper presented at 35th Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, 1997, Reno, United States.