Self-Perceived Competence in Mainland China: A Multiwave Longitudinal Examination of Internalizing Symptoms in Chinese Adolescents

Joseph R. Cohen, Dana M. Sheshko, Alyssa M. Ames, Jami F. Young, Amy P. Hansford, Xiongzhao Zhu, Shuqiao Yao, John R.Z. Abela

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present 9-wave, 2-year study examined whether Cole's (1991) theory of self-perceived competence could help explain vulnerability to depressive and anxiety symptoms in a sample of adolescents from mainland China. Participants included 624 adolescents (319 females and 305 males) from an urban school in Changsha (n = 308) and from a rural school in Liuyang (n = 316). Findings showed that self-perceived academic competence was negatively associated with prospective depressive and anxiety symptoms. Meanwhile, adolescents with low levels of self-perceived social competence were at heightened risk for depressive symptoms during times of increased stressors (supporting a vulnerability-stress model). These findings advance past research by highlighting new developmental pathways for depressive and anxiety symptoms in Chinese adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)564-579
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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