Self-managing schools and access for disadvantaged students: Organizational behaviour and school admissions

Christopher Lubienski, Jin Lee, Liz Gordon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

New Zealand moved two decades ago toward a self-managing model for schools, which included requiring schools to impose geographic admissions' schemes when oversubscribed. There is global interest in alternative models of decentralized school governance, and this model offers a useful case for studying how schools use autonomy in more competitive environments. A central question is whether such systems can provide access to desired schooling options for disadvantaged students. This paper uses geo-spatial analyses to take a snapshot of how schools draw attendance boundaries relative to the demographic distribution of different communities. The evidence indicates that many more affluent schools create zones that, individually and in the aggregate, limit access to more desirable schools for children from disadvantaged backgrounds. The patterns suggest that schools may do this in order to protect or enhance their market positions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-98
Number of pages17
JournalNew Zealand Journal of Educational Studies
Volume48
Issue number1
StatePublished - Sep 13 2013

Keywords

  • Access
  • Enrolment patterns
  • Equity.
  • Geographic analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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