Self-esteem among Jamaican children: Exploring the impact of skin color and rural/urban residence

Gail M. (Anderson) Ferguson, Phebe Cramer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigates the extent to which two different models predict the relation of self-esteem to skin color and rural/urban residence among Jamaican children. To explain this relation, Crocker and Major's Self-protective hypothesis and Harter's Additive model were examined among 200 African-Caribbean children from rural (n = 85) and urban (n = 115) elementary schools in eastern Jamaica. Support was found for both of these models. Specifically, the Self-protective hypothesis predicted higher self-esteem among rural children and the Additive model predicted higher self-esteem among older children for whom self-identification and ideal self skin color were both White. Implications for Jamaican children are discussed followed by potential application to other children of African descent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)345-359
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

Keywords

  • Black
  • Jamaican
  • Rural/urban
  • Self-esteem
  • Skin color
  • Social stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Self-esteem among Jamaican children: Exploring the impact of skin color and rural/urban residence'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this