Select corn coproducts from the ethanol industry and their potential as ingredients in pet foods

M. R.C. De Godoy, L. L. Bauer, C. M. Parsons, G. C. Fahey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to determine the chemical composition and nutritive value of corn protein product 1 (CPP 1), corn protein product 2 (CPP 2), and corn fiber (CF), novel coproducts of the ethanol industry, and compare these feed ingredients with standard plant protein ingredients [soybean meal (SBM), distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), corn gluten meal (CGlM), and corn germ meal (CGeM)], and to compare CF sources (CF control 1 and control 2) with standard fiber sources (peanut hulls, Solka-Floc, and beet pulp) commonly used in pet foods. Corn fiber, CPP 1, and CPP 2 were produced at a pilot-scale modified dry-grind plant, with CPP 2 having a greater degree of purification than CPP 1. Crude protein values for CPP 2 and CPP 1 were 57.3 and 49.7%, respectively. Total dietary fiber concentration was 29% for CPP 2 and 23.5% for CPP 1. Acid-hydrolyzed fat and GE concentrations were similar for these ingredients. In a protein efficiency ratio assay, no differences (P > 0.05) in feed intake, BW gain, or CP intake were noted for CPP 2, CPP 1, or CGlM. However, feeding CPP 2 resulted in a greater (P < 0.05) G:F ratio and protein efficiency ratio than CPP 1 and CGlM. In a cecectomized rooster assay, CGlM had numerically the greatest standardized total AA, total essential AA, and total nonessential AA digestibilities, but they were not different (P > 0.05) from CPP 1 or SBM values. Corn germ meal resulted in the least values, but they were not different from those for DDGS and CPP 1. The greatest values for true nitrogen-corrected ME were obtained with CGlM, followed by CPP 2, DDGS, CPP 1, SBM, and CGeM. Distillers dried grains with solubles and CPP 1 had similar true nitrogen-corrected ME values, and they were not different from values for CPP 2 and SBM. In vitro CP disappearance was greatest (P < 0.05) for CGlM (94.1%), intermediate for DDGS (76.8%) and CPP 1 (77.5%), and least for CPP 2 (74.1%) and CGeM (67.7%). Corn fibers contained predominantly insoluble dietary fiber (1% or less of soluble dietary fiber), with a moderate CP concentration. In vitro OM disappearance for the fiber sources, when using inoculum from dog feces, revealed that with the exception of beet pulp, which had a moderarte disappearance value after 16 h of fermentation (17.7%), all fiber substrates had a nonsignificant extent of fermentation. In conclusion, novel corn coproducts had properties comparable with the standard protein and fiber sources used in animal nutrition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-199
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume87
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

Keywords

  • Corn coproduct
  • Dog
  • Fiber
  • In vitro
  • Nutritive value
  • Protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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