Segmental accuracy: A recommended training sequence for moving learners from accurate perception to accurate and automatic production in the stream of speech

Monica Richards, Elena Cotos

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A key reason L2 learners struggle to pronounce new segmentals is because their L1 has trained them to hear L2 phonemes as allophonic. When learners cannot accurately hear a word’s phonemic structure, they are able to self-assess their L2 pronunciation only by comparing their conscious knowledge of how the word should be pronounced with the physiological “feel” of their vocal organs. But is it possible to perform this task consciously on a regular basis? After all, L2 speakers must simultaneously engage in several additional, higher-level cognitive processes also harder in L2 than L1, for example, comprehending what others are saying, drawing connections between what is said to what is already known, planning what to say next and figuring out how best to say it. L2 learners must therefore develop the ability to self-assess subconsciously whether the phones they pronounce are categorized by the L2 as the phonemes they intend. Not only that, but their physical production of accurate L2 phoneme distinctions must become habitual. This paper therefore introduces a recommended training sequence for moving learners from accurate perception to accurate and automatic production of challenging L2 segmentals in the stream of speech.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 10th Pronunciation in Second Language Learning and Teaching Conference
EditorsJohn Levis, Charles Nagle, Erin Todey
PublisherIowa State University
Pages413-422
StatePublished - 2019
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameAnnual Proceedings of the Pronunciation in Second Language Learning and Teaching Conference
Volume10
ISSN (Print)2380-9566

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