Secondhand tobacco smoke and municipal smokefree ordinances: Attitudes of restaurant and bar owners and managers

Scott P. Hays

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Understanding the attitudes of restaurant and bar owners and managers toward a smokefree city ordinance can contribute greatly to the success of a smokefree policy campaign. While local opposition to a smokefree policy always arises from restaurant and bar owners, this study of restaurant and bar owners and managers in two Midwestern cities reveals that over two-thirds (67.1%) support a smokefree restaurant policy, and over 40% support a policy that would include bars. Moreover, most prefer the local government to require the city to be smokefree rather than choose to go smokefree on their own: only 1 in 5 would even consider going smokefree independently. The study explains that this is primarily due to widespread and unfounded fears of economic loss. Finally, the article recommends that education campaigns encouraging individual restaurants to go smokefree would be a far less effective strategy than persuading a municipal government to enact a smokefree ordinance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-295
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Drug Education
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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