SdiA, an N-acylhomoserine lactone receptor, becomes active during the transit of Salmonella enterica through the gastrointestinal tract of turtles

Jenee N. Smith, Jessica L. Dyszel, Jitesh A. Soares, Craig D. Ellermeier, Craig Altier, Sara D. Lawhon, L. Garry Adams, Vjollca Konjufca, Roy Curtiss, James M. Slauch, Brian M M Ahmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: LuxR-type transcription factors are typically used by bacteria to determine the population density of their own species by detecting N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). However, while Escherichia and Salmonella encode a LuxR-type AHL receptor, SdiA, they cannot synthesize AHLs. In vitro, It is known that SdiA can detect AHLs produced by other bacterial species. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this report, we tested the hypothesis that SdiA detects the AHL-production of other bacterial species within the animal host SdiA did not detect AHLs during the transit of Salmonella through the gastrointestinal tract of a guinea pig, a rabbit, a cow, 5 mice, 6 pigs, or 12 chickens. However, SdiA was activated during the transit of Salmonella through turtles. All turtles examined were colonized by the AHL-producing species Aeromonas hydrophila. Conclusions/Significance: We conclude that the normal gastrointestinal microbiota of most animal species do not produce AHLs of the correct type, in an appropriate location, or in sufficient quantities to activate SdiA. However, the results obtained with turtles represent the first demonstration of SdiA activity in animals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere2826
JournalPloS one
Volume3
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 30 2008

Fingerprint

Salmonella
Turtles
Salmonella enterica
Lactones
lactones
turtles
gastrointestinal system
Gastrointestinal Tract
receptors
Animals
Aeromonas hydrophila
Escherichia
animals
Population Density
guinea pigs
Chickens
Bacteria
Guinea Pigs
population density
Transcription Factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Smith, J. N., Dyszel, J. L., Soares, J. A., Ellermeier, C. D., Altier, C., Lawhon, S. D., ... Ahmer, B. M. M. (2008). SdiA, an N-acylhomoserine lactone receptor, becomes active during the transit of Salmonella enterica through the gastrointestinal tract of turtles. PloS one, 3(7), [e2826]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0002826

SdiA, an N-acylhomoserine lactone receptor, becomes active during the transit of Salmonella enterica through the gastrointestinal tract of turtles. / Smith, Jenee N.; Dyszel, Jessica L.; Soares, Jitesh A.; Ellermeier, Craig D.; Altier, Craig; Lawhon, Sara D.; Adams, L. Garry; Konjufca, Vjollca; Curtiss, Roy; Slauch, James M.; Ahmer, Brian M M.

In: PloS one, Vol. 3, No. 7, e2826, 30.07.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, JN, Dyszel, JL, Soares, JA, Ellermeier, CD, Altier, C, Lawhon, SD, Adams, LG, Konjufca, V, Curtiss, R, Slauch, JM & Ahmer, BMM 2008, 'SdiA, an N-acylhomoserine lactone receptor, becomes active during the transit of Salmonella enterica through the gastrointestinal tract of turtles', PloS one, vol. 3, no. 7, e2826. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0002826
Smith, Jenee N. ; Dyszel, Jessica L. ; Soares, Jitesh A. ; Ellermeier, Craig D. ; Altier, Craig ; Lawhon, Sara D. ; Adams, L. Garry ; Konjufca, Vjollca ; Curtiss, Roy ; Slauch, James M. ; Ahmer, Brian M M. / SdiA, an N-acylhomoserine lactone receptor, becomes active during the transit of Salmonella enterica through the gastrointestinal tract of turtles. In: PloS one. 2008 ; Vol. 3, No. 7.
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