Abstract

This Podcast features an interview with Zeynep Madak-Erdogan, Benita Katzenellenbogen, and John Katzenellenbogen, authors of a Research Article that appears in the 24 May 2016 issue of Science Signaling, about designer estrogens that have the therapeutic benefits of natural estrogens, but less cancer risk. In addition to controlling female reproduction and secondary sex characteristics, estrogen is also an important regulator of metabolism, the vasculature, and bone. Estrogen production decreases as women enter menopause, leading to changes in metabolism, a reduced ability to repair blood vessels, and decreased bone density. Although hormone replacement therapy can alleviate these symptoms, it can also promote the growth ofuterine and breast cancers. Madak-Erdogan et al. engineered synthetic forms of estrogen that activate the cytosolic signaling pathways that are associated with the beneficial effects of this hormone without also activating the nuclear signaling events associated with cancer growth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberpc13
JournalScience Signaling
Volume9
Issue number429
DOIs
StatePublished - May 24 2016

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Webcasts
Estrogens
Metabolism
Estradiol Congeners
Bone
Hormones
Hormone Replacement Therapy
Growth
Menopause
Sex Characteristics
Bone Density
Reproduction
Blood Vessels
Blood vessels
Neoplasms
Interviews
Breast Neoplasms
Bone and Bones
Repair
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Science Signaling podcast for 24 May 2016 : Designer estrogens. / Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Van hook, Annalisa M.

In: Science Signaling, Vol. 9, No. 429, pc13, 24.05.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Katzenellenbogen, Benita S ; Katzenellenbogen, John A. ; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep ; Van hook, Annalisa M. / Science Signaling podcast for 24 May 2016 : Designer estrogens. In: Science Signaling. 2016 ; Vol. 9, No. 429.
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