Saline groundwater discharges within/from a midwestern us intracratonic basin: the importance of geologic structures in CO2 sequestration

Samuel V. Panno, Walton R. Kelly, Keith C. Hackley, Zohreh Askari-Khorasgani, Richard J. Rice, Hue-Hwa Hwang, Noel C. Krothe

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The successful sequestration of CO 100,000 mg/L). Naturally-occurring saline anomalies have been identified throughout the Illinois Basin (in Illinois, southern Indiana and northern Kentucky) as springs or localized saline seeps into fresh shallow drift aquifers, and many are of historic significance. In the course of this investigation, about 30 locations of upwelling saline groundwater within the Illinois Basin have been identified, and are currently being investigated. All saline springs are being sampled for chemical and isotopic composition with emphasis on halide chemistry (Cl, Br, I) in order to determine the source formations of the salinity. In addition, six cross sections through the Illinois Basin are being prepared and will include all available Cl concentrations to help evaluate local and regional groundwater movement. The saline springs of the Illinois Basin were found to be coincident with geologic structures within, and at the margins of the Illinois Basin. Preliminary results reveal that Cl/Br ratios range from 150 to 700 and originate from Cambrian- to Pennsylvanian-age sedimentary rocks. Chloride concentrations of these springs are typically around 500 mg/L and rarely exceed 8000 mg/L. Springs with the greatest concentrations of Cl also contain H< 2) S which supports colonies of white, filamentous, chemolithotrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAbstracts with Programs - Geological Society of America
Place of PublicationBoulder, CO
PublisherGeological Society of America
Pages44
Volume42
StatePublished - 2010

Keywords

  • ISGS
  • ISWS

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