Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ybr004c and its human homologue are required for addition of the second mannose during glycosylphosphatidylinositol precursor assembly

Anne Lise Fabre, Peter Orlean, Christopher H. Taron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Addition of the second mannose is the only obvious step in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) precursor assembly for which a responsible gene has not been discovered. A bioinformatics-based strategy identified the essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ybr004c protein as a candidate for the second GPI α-mannosyltransferase (GPI-MT-II). S. cerevisiae cells depleted of Ybr004cp have weakened cell walls and abnormal morphology, are unable to incorporate [3H]inositol into proteins, and accumulate a GPI intermediate having a single mannose that is likely modified with ethanolamine phosphate. These data indicate that Ybr004cp-depleted yeast cells are defective in second mannose addition to GPIs, and suggest that Ybr004cp is GPI-MT-II or an essential subunit of that enzyme. Ybr004cp homologues are encoded in all sequenced eukaryotic genomes, and are predicted to have 8 transmembrane domains, but show no obvious resemblance to members of established glycosyltransferase families. The human Ybr004cp homologue can substitute for its S. cerevisiae counterpart in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1160-1168
Number of pages9
JournalFEBS Journal
Volume272
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Keywords

  • Cell wall
  • Glycosylphosphatidylinositol
  • Mannosyltransferase
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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