Rules of thumb: British history and ‘imperial culture’ in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Britain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper examines the traditions of both British imperial and British domestic historiography and calls for a re-mapping of both so that the so-called separate spheres of ‘home’ and ‘away’ may be brought back into the same fields of debate. Its central claim is that imperial ideology and its effects were not phenomena ‘out there’. Empire was not a singular place; nor did ‘home’ exist in isolation from it. In spite of the polarization, which has been characteristic of their historiographies, their relationship was dialectic rather than dichotomous. These insights, while derived in part from new trends inside British history itself, owe both their theoretical rigor and their self-avowedly political concerns to post-colonial and feminist historiographical work, which together insist on the desacralization of ‘Britain’ proper.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)483-504
Number of pages22
JournalWomen's History Review
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1994
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • History

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