Rule and instance based strategies in expert judgment

Jennifer Tsai, Alex Kirlik, Alex Kosorukoff, Sarah Miller

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Expert judgment has been conceived in contrasting ways. The naturalistic decision making (NDM) paradigm has put forth a largely instance-based account, viewing experts as relying on a storehouse of cases, such as in the recognition-primed decision (RPD) model. Cognitive psychology has instead advanced largely heuristic-or rule-based accounts, such as in the lens model and fast-and-frugal heuristics. To clarify the relationship between these accounts, we performed two experiments in which novices and experts performed a task explicitly designed to reveal signatures in the data of the use of both rule-and instancebased strategies. Modeling revealed that expert judgment benefited from both the use of linear cueweighting rules and instance memory. Instance memory use was reflected in experts' (but not novices') ability to handle task nonlinearity, and the finding that expert accuracy across instances was positively correlated with the number of times each instance was historically seen in past-experiences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008
Pages413-417
Number of pages5
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Event52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Sep 22 2008Sep 26 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period9/22/089/26/08

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Tsai, J., Kirlik, A., Kosorukoff, A., & Miller, S. (2008). Rule and instance based strategies in expert judgment. In 52nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2008 (pp. 413-417). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 1).