ROLE REVERSALS: AN ANALYSIS OF THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS ACHIEVED WITH DISRUPTIVE BOYS DURING THEIR APPOINTMENTS AS PEER MONITORS

Susan A Fowler, B. Susan Dougherty, Kimberly C. Kirby, Frank W. Kohler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Three 7-year-old boys with histories of negative interactions were appointed to monitor individual classmates during daily noon recess. As monitors, the boys awarded points to their classmates for playing appropriately and, on rare occasions, withdrew a point for negative interactions. The three boys immediately decreased their own rates of negative interactions during the sessions in which they were appointed as monitors. Two of the boys concomitantly increased their rates of positive interactions. Their reductions in negative interactions were not maintained during reversals and did not clearly generalize to the morning or afternoon recess periods. Subsequent appointment of the boys as peer monitors during the morning recess produced similar improvements in their behavior. Results suggest that appointment to the role of peer monitor may itself function as an intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-444
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Behavior Analysis
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • generalization
  • group contingencies
  • peers
  • playground behaviors
  • social skills

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Philosophy

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