Role of attention in the generation and modulation of tinnitus

Larry E. Roberts, Fatima T Husain, Jos J. Eggermont

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Neural mechanisms that detect changes in the auditory environment appear to rely on processes that predict sensory state. Here we propose that in tinnitus there is a disparity between what the brain predicts it should be hearing (this prediction based on aberrant neural activity occurring in cortical frequency regions affected by hearing loss and underlying the tinnitus percept) and the acoustic information that is delivered to the brain by the damaged cochlea. The disparity between the predicted and delivered inputs activates a system for auditory attention that facilitates through subcortical neuromodulatory systems neuroplastic changes that contribute to the generation of tinnitus. We review behavioral and functional brain imaging evidence for persisting auditory attention in tinnitus and present a qualitative model for how attention operates in normal hearing and may be triggered in tinnitus accompanied by hearing loss. The viewpoint has implications for the role of cochlear pathology in tinnitus, for neural plasticity and the contribution of forebrain neuromodulatory systems in tinnitus, and for tinnitus management and treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1754-1773
Number of pages20
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

Fingerprint

Tinnitus
Cochlea
Hearing Loss
Hearing
Functional Neuroimaging
Neuronal Plasticity
Brain
Prosencephalon
Acoustics
Pathology

Keywords

  • Auditory attention
  • Cholingeric neuromodulation
  • Hyperacusis
  • Neural mechanisms of tinnitus
  • Neural plasticity
  • Neural synchrony

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Role of attention in the generation and modulation of tinnitus. / Roberts, Larry E.; Husain, Fatima T; Eggermont, Jos J.

In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, Vol. 37, No. 8, 01.09.2013, p. 1754-1773.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Roberts, Larry E. ; Husain, Fatima T ; Eggermont, Jos J. / Role of attention in the generation and modulation of tinnitus. In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. 2013 ; Vol. 37, No. 8. pp. 1754-1773.
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