Role identity, role investments, and paternal involvement: Implications for parenting programs for men

Brent A. McBride, Thomas R. Rane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions and attitudes of fathers and mothers about their own and their spouse's parental roles, and to identify relationships between those perceptions and attitudes and variations in fathers' actual involvement in child rearing. Self-report and interview data were collected from 89 middle-class families to measure each parent's participation in three categories of parental involvement (i.e., interaction, accessibility, and responsibility), as well as perceptions of role expectations for fathers and perceived parental role investments. Several significant relationships between levels of father involvement, perceptions of the paternal role, and perceived role investments were revealed. Multiple regression procedures indicated that mothers' perceptions of their partners' investments in parent, spouse, and worker roles were the best predictors of total father involvement. Implications are drawn from the findings for the development and implementation of parenting programs for men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-197
Number of pages25
JournalCognitive Development
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Role identity, role investments, and paternal involvement: Implications for parenting programs for men'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this