Risk factors for sporadic domestically acquired Salmonella serovar Enteritidis infections: A case-control study in Ontario, Canada, 2011

D. Middleton, R. Savage, M. K. Tighe, L. Vrbova, R. Walton, Y. Whitfield, C. Varga, B. Lee, L. Rosella, B. Dhar, C. Johnson, R. Ahmed, V. G. Allen, N. S. Crowcroft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In Ontario, Canada, the number of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) cases increased over the years 2005-2010. A population-based case-control study was undertaken from January to August 2011 for the purpose of identifying risk factors for acquiring illness due to SE within Ontario. A total of 199 cases and 241 controls were enrolled. After adjustment for confounders, consuming any poultry meat [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2·24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·31-3·83], processed chicken (aOR 3·32, 95% CI 1·26-8·76) and not washing hands following handling of raw eggs (OR 2·82, 95% CI 1·48-5·37) were significantly associated with SE infection. The population attributable fraction was 46% for any poultry meat consumption and 10% for processed chicken. Poultry meat continues to be identified as a risk factor for SE illness. Control of SE at source, as well as proper food handling practices, are required to reduce the number of SE cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1411-1421
Number of pages11
JournalEpidemiology and Infection
Volume142
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Case-control study
  • human
  • phage type
  • population attributable fraction
  • Salmonella Enteritidis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Infectious Diseases

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