Right hemisphere sensitivity to word- And sentence-level context: Evidence from event-related brain potentials

Seana Coulson, Cyma Van Petten, Kara D. Federmeier, Marta Kutas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Researchers using lateralized stimuli have suggested that the left hemisphere is sensitive to sentence-level context, whereas the right hemisphere (RH) primarily processes word-level meaning. The authors investigated this message-blind RH model by measuring associative priming with event-related brain potentials (ERPs). For word pairs in isolation, associated words elicited more positive ERPs than unassociated words with similar magnitudes and onset latencies in both visual fields. Embedded in sentences, these same pairs showed large sentential context effects in both fields. Small effects of association were observed, confined to incongruous sentences after right visual hemifield presentation but present for both congruous and incongruous sentences after left visual hemifield presentation. Results do not support the message-blind RH model but do suggest hemispheric asymmetries in the use of word and sentence context during real-time processing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-147
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Evoked Potentials
brain
event
Brain
Visual Fields
asymmetry
evidence
social isolation
stimulus
Research Personnel
present
Right Hemisphere
Event-related Brain Potentials
time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Right hemisphere sensitivity to word- And sentence-level context : Evidence from event-related brain potentials. / Coulson, Seana; Van Petten, Cyma; Federmeier, Kara D.; Kutas, Marta.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 129-147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6d11797c9af94c82a9fdcbf7e7240029,
title = "Right hemisphere sensitivity to word- And sentence-level context: Evidence from event-related brain potentials",
abstract = "Researchers using lateralized stimuli have suggested that the left hemisphere is sensitive to sentence-level context, whereas the right hemisphere (RH) primarily processes word-level meaning. The authors investigated this message-blind RH model by measuring associative priming with event-related brain potentials (ERPs). For word pairs in isolation, associated words elicited more positive ERPs than unassociated words with similar magnitudes and onset latencies in both visual fields. Embedded in sentences, these same pairs showed large sentential context effects in both fields. Small effects of association were observed, confined to incongruous sentences after right visual hemifield presentation but present for both congruous and incongruous sentences after left visual hemifield presentation. Results do not support the message-blind RH model but do suggest hemispheric asymmetries in the use of word and sentence context during real-time processing.",
author = "Seana Coulson and {Van Petten}, Cyma and Federmeier, {Kara D.} and Marta Kutas",
year = "2005",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/0278-7393.31.1.129",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "129--147",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition",
issn = "0278-7393",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Right hemisphere sensitivity to word- And sentence-level context

T2 - Evidence from event-related brain potentials

AU - Coulson, Seana

AU - Van Petten, Cyma

AU - Federmeier, Kara D.

AU - Kutas, Marta

PY - 2005/1/1

Y1 - 2005/1/1

N2 - Researchers using lateralized stimuli have suggested that the left hemisphere is sensitive to sentence-level context, whereas the right hemisphere (RH) primarily processes word-level meaning. The authors investigated this message-blind RH model by measuring associative priming with event-related brain potentials (ERPs). For word pairs in isolation, associated words elicited more positive ERPs than unassociated words with similar magnitudes and onset latencies in both visual fields. Embedded in sentences, these same pairs showed large sentential context effects in both fields. Small effects of association were observed, confined to incongruous sentences after right visual hemifield presentation but present for both congruous and incongruous sentences after left visual hemifield presentation. Results do not support the message-blind RH model but do suggest hemispheric asymmetries in the use of word and sentence context during real-time processing.

AB - Researchers using lateralized stimuli have suggested that the left hemisphere is sensitive to sentence-level context, whereas the right hemisphere (RH) primarily processes word-level meaning. The authors investigated this message-blind RH model by measuring associative priming with event-related brain potentials (ERPs). For word pairs in isolation, associated words elicited more positive ERPs than unassociated words with similar magnitudes and onset latencies in both visual fields. Embedded in sentences, these same pairs showed large sentential context effects in both fields. Small effects of association were observed, confined to incongruous sentences after right visual hemifield presentation but present for both congruous and incongruous sentences after left visual hemifield presentation. Results do not support the message-blind RH model but do suggest hemispheric asymmetries in the use of word and sentence context during real-time processing.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=12444306340&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=12444306340&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/0278-7393.31.1.129

DO - 10.1037/0278-7393.31.1.129

M3 - Article

C2 - 15641911

AN - SCOPUS:12444306340

VL - 31

SP - 129

EP - 147

JO - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition

JF - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition

SN - 0278-7393

IS - 1

ER -