Review of charging power levels and infrastructure for plug-in electric and hybrid vehicles

Murat Yilmaz, Philip T Krein

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper reviews the current status and implementation of battery chargers, charging power levels and infrastructure for plug-in electric vehicles and hybrids. Battery performance depends both on types and design of the batteries, and on charger characteristics and charging infrastructure. Charger systems are categorized into off-board and on-board types with unidirectional or bidirectional power flow. Unidirectional charging limits hardware requirements and simplifies interconnection issues. Bidirectional charging supports battery energy injection back to the grid. Typical onboard chargers restrict the power because of weight, space and cost constraints. They can be integrated with the electric drive for avoiding these problems. The availability of a charging infrastructure reduces on-board energy storage requirements and costs. On-board charger systems can be conductive or inductive. While conductive chargers use direct contact, inductive chargers transfer power magnetically. An off-board charger can be designed for high charging rates and is less constrained by size and weight. Level 1 (convenience), Level 2 (primary), and Level 3 (fast) power levels are discussed. These system configurations vary from country to country depending on the source and plug capacity standards. Various power level chargers and infrastructure configurations are presented, compared, and evaluated based on amount of power, charging time and location, cost, equipment, effect on the grid, and other factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2012
Event2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012 - Greenville, SC, United States
Duration: Mar 4 2012Mar 8 2012

Publication series

Name2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012

Other

Other2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012
CountryUnited States
CityGreenville, SC
Period3/4/123/8/12

Fingerprint

Plug-in hybrid vehicles
Charging (batteries)
Costs
Electric drives
Energy storage
Availability
Hardware
Plug-in electric vehicles

Keywords

  • Level 1, 2 and 3 chargers
  • charging infrastructure
  • conductive and inductive charging
  • integrated chargers
  • plug-in electric vehicles
  • unidirectional/bidirectional chargers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Automotive Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Yilmaz, M., & Krein, P. T. (2012). Review of charging power levels and infrastructure for plug-in electric and hybrid vehicles. In 2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012 [6183208] (2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012). https://doi.org/10.1109/IEVC.2012.6183208

Review of charging power levels and infrastructure for plug-in electric and hybrid vehicles. / Yilmaz, Murat; Krein, Philip T.

2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012. 2012. 6183208 (2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Yilmaz, M & Krein, PT 2012, Review of charging power levels and infrastructure for plug-in electric and hybrid vehicles. in 2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012., 6183208, 2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012, 2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012, Greenville, SC, United States, 3/4/12. https://doi.org/10.1109/IEVC.2012.6183208
Yilmaz M, Krein PT. Review of charging power levels and infrastructure for plug-in electric and hybrid vehicles. In 2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012. 2012. 6183208. (2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012). https://doi.org/10.1109/IEVC.2012.6183208
Yilmaz, Murat ; Krein, Philip T. / Review of charging power levels and infrastructure for plug-in electric and hybrid vehicles. 2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012. 2012. (2012 IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference, IEVC 2012).
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