Resurrecting the 1938 St. Louis Post-dispatch symposium on the freedom of the press: Examining its contributions and their implications for today

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In 1938, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch convened a symposium on the freedom of the press in response to a letter from President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The President hoped to have a "national symposium" to discuss whether a free press could truly exist in a for-profit media system. The Symposium on the Freedom of the Press brought together 120 public intellectuals to discuss the matter. Here, I attempt to reacquaint scholars with this forgotten collection of contributions on the subject. I specifically focus my analysis on two major themes: the way contributors define public interest and their response to Roosevelt's question as to whether a newspaper could only be edited in the interests of the "counting room," as he put it.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-326
Number of pages16
JournalJournalism Studies
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Free press
  • Professionalism
  • Public interest
  • Public service
  • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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