Resting-state functional connectivity differentiates anxious apprehension and anxious arousal

Erin N. Burdwood, Zachary P. Infantolino, Laura D. Crocker, Jeffrey M. Spielberg, Marie T. Banich, Gregory A. Miller, Wendy Heller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Brain regions in the default mode network (DMN) display greater functional connectivity at rest or during self-referential processing than during goal-directed tasks. The present study assessed resting-state connectivity as a function of anxious apprehension and anxious arousal, independent of depressive symptoms, in order to understand how these dimensions disrupt cognition. Whole-brain, seed-based analyses indicated differences between anxious apprehension and anxious arousal in DMN functional connectivity. Lower connectivity associated with higher anxious apprehension suggests decreased adaptive, inner-focused thought processes, whereas higher connectivity at higher levels of anxious arousal may reflect elevated monitoring of physiological responses to threat. These findings further the conceptualization of anxious apprehension and anxious arousal as distinct psychological dimensions with distinct neural instantiations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1451-1459
Number of pages9
JournalPsychophysiology
Volume53
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Psychopathological
  • fMRI/PET/MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Biological Psychiatry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Resting-state functional connectivity differentiates anxious apprehension and anxious arousal'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Burdwood, E. N., Infantolino, Z. P., Crocker, L. D., Spielberg, J. M., Banich, M. T., Miller, G. A., & Heller, W. (2016). Resting-state functional connectivity differentiates anxious apprehension and anxious arousal. Psychophysiology, 53(10), 1451-1459. https://doi.org/10.1111/psyp.12696