Response bias and the need for extensive mail questionnaire follow-ups among selected recreation samples ( Appalachians).

W. E. Hammitt, C. D. McDonald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The hypothesis advanced by Wellman et al. (1980), that extensive follow-up efforts to achieve high mail questionnaire response rates may not be necessary in certain types of recreation studies, was examined. Both a non-response and a date-of-return analysis for data from innertube floaters of two Southern Appalachian streams (USA) showed very few significant differences. Suggests that survey response rates typically considered unacceptable in recreation survey research may be adequate at representing selected recreation samples. -Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-216
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Leisure Research
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1982

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management

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