Religion (USA)

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionary

Abstract

This article charts the contours of the Great War as an American religious experience, focusing on the ways in which the study of religion and the Great War in America forces an examination of what is meant by “religion.” American clergy and American soldiers, through their rhetoric and their actions, forged and practiced a type of religion that fused war’s physical experiences with metaphysical meanings, and joined the national to the divine. This religion flourished in the interwar period and continues to shape so-called civil religious discourse and practice to this day.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication1914-1918-online
Subtitle of host publicationInternational Encyclopedia of the First World War
EditorsUte Daniel, Peter Gatrell, Oliver Janz, Heather Jones, Jennifer Keene, Alan Kramer, Bill Nasson
PublisherFreie Universität Berlin
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 8 2014

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  • Cite this

    Ebel, J. H. (2014). Religion (USA). In U. Daniel, P. Gatrell, O. Janz, H. Jones, J. Keene, A. Kramer, & B. Nasson (Eds.), 1914-1918-online: International Encyclopedia of the First World War Freie Universität Berlin. https://doi.org/10.15463/ie1418.10019