Relationships between whole-body chemical composition, physically dissected carcass parts and backfat measurements in pigs

A. J. Rook, M. Ellis, C. T. Whittemore, P. Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Log-linear relationships between various measurements of the chemical and physical body composition of the pig were obtained in four datasets representing a range of sexes, genotypes and feeding treatments. One of these datasets (dataset 1) comprised genetic control and selection line Large White pigs. There were significant differences between datasets for most of the relationships investigated. The causes of the differences cannot be determined. Within datasets, relationships between various body components and the weight of crude protein in the whole body were unaffected by genotype or sex. The relationships of both intermuscular fat and trimmed carcass lipid with whole body lipid differed significantly between the control and selection lines in dataset 1. Fat thickness measurements taken over the m. longissimus at the last rib were less at the same body lipid in the selection line than the control line suggesting a redistribution of fat away from this area as a result of selection. Relationships between viscera, lungs and empty body weight were significantly affected by line while those between trimmed carcass, liver, kidneys and empty body weight were significantly affected by sex. Selection line pigs had less perinephric and retroperitoneal fat than controls at the same whole body fat weight and less subcutaneous fat at the same cold carcass weight. There were no significant line effects on lean or bone weight distribution. Selection line pigs had significantly less subcutaneous fat in the collar joint and more intermuscular fat in the ham. There were few significant sex effects on tissue weight distribution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-273
Number of pages11
JournalAnimal Production
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1987
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

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