Relationships between longissimus glycolytic potential and swine growth performance, carcass traits, and pork quality

D. N. Hamilton, K. D. Miller, M. Ellis, F. K. McKeith, E. R. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The relationships between glycolytic potential and growth performance, carcass traits, and pork quality were investigated in a group of 72 pigs from the same genetic line. Glycolytic potential (GP) was determined on live-animal biopsy samples and postmortem samples taken from the longissimus muscle, and free glucose concentration was measured on the exudate from the longissimus muscle taken post-mortem. The mean live-animal and postmortem GP and free glucose values were 201.6 μmol/g (range = 113.8 to 301.1), 149.8 μmol/g (range = 91.0 to 270.5) and 110.1 mg/dL (range = 30.0 to 406.0), respectively. Correlations between live-animal and postmortem GP and free glucose ranged from 0.47 to 0.70; however, all three measures were weakly related to growth and carcass traits (r = 0.03 to -0.22; P > 0.05). Correlations of GP and free glucose values with fresh pork quality measurements were moderate (r = 0.23 [P < 0.05] to -0.63 [P < 0.001]). Regression analysis suggested that a one standard deviation increase in live-animal and postmortem GP and free glucose resulted in an increase in L* values (0.99, 1.32, and 2.05, respectively) and drip loss (0.85, 1.10, and 1.39 percentage units, respectively), as well as a decrease in ultimate pH (0.05, 0.11, and 0.16, respectively). Correlations between GP and cooking loss and tenderness and juiciness scores ranged between 0.16 (P > 0.05) to 0.34 (P < 0.01). Free glucose concentration showed no relationship (P > 0.05) with cooking loss, tenderness, and juiciness. Regression analysis suggested that a one standard deviation increase in live-animal and postmortem GP increased cooking loss (1.26% and 1.65%, respectively) and would improve taste panel tenderness (0.54 and 0.44, respectively) and juiciness (0.40 and 0.48, respectively) scores. Increasing GP and free glucose was also associated with decreased longissimus fat and protein, and increased moisture contents (r = 0.14 [P > 0.05] to -0.45 [P < 0.001]). Overall, relationships with fresh meat quality characteristics were stronger for free glucose values than either live-animal or postmortem GP. Results from this study indicate that decreasing longissimus GP and free glucose concentrations may improve pork color and water-holding capacity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2206-2212
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume81
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2003

Keywords

  • Glucose
  • Glycogen
  • Meat Quality
  • Pork

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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