Relationship between expectancy of psychological benefits and mood alteration in joggers

Bonnie G. Berger, David R. Owen, Robert W Motl, Louis Parks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two experiments investigated the possible relationship between expectancy of psychological benefits from exercise and acute mood change. In the first study, participants (N = 71) reported their expectancies using an open-ended instrument and completed the POMS before and after jogging. Results of a 2 (pre-, post-exercise) × 2 (gender) × 3 (class) MANOVA indicated that there were significant acute mood benefits for iuomen (p < .0001) and for men (p < .03). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the relationship between expectancy of psychological benefits and mood change approached significance (p < .06). In the second study, participants (N = 68) responded to an objective expectancy questionnaire and again completed the POMS before and after jogging. Results of the 2 × 2 × 3 MANOVA indicated a significant pre-to post-exercise mood change (p < .0001). No relationship was found between expectancy and mood change. In conclusion, joggers in both studies reported significant short-term mood benefits, but there was no conclusive evidence that expectancy was related to mood alteration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Psychology
Volume29
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

Keywords

  • Jogging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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