Regionalization and foot-and-mouth disease control in South America: Lessons from spatial models of coordination and interactions

Karl M. Rich, Alex Winter-Nelson, Nicholas Brozović

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Regulatory interventions to control animal diseases, such as foot-and-mouth-disease (FMD), can yield substantial economic benefits to regions with large livestock sectors. However, because disease vectors span national borders, the full benefits of regulation can only be achieved through international coordination. Divergent incentives between large-scale operations producing for export and smallholders producing for subsistence or local markets may mitigate coordination of control efforts. A series of spatial games are used to characterize these types of regional externalities. Results suggest that promoting investments in market development in lagging regions may have the greatest potential for eradicating the disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)526-540
Number of pages15
JournalQuarterly Review of Economics and Finance
Volume45
Issue number2-3 SPEC. ISS.
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2005

Keywords

  • Agricultural policy
  • Foot-and-mouth disease
  • Regional externalities
  • Social interactions
  • Spatial games

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Finance
  • Economics and Econometrics

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