Regional Anesthesia of the Dentition in Bennett's Wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus): Anatomical Landmarks and Approaches Assessed with Computed Tomography and Gross Dissection

Bridget Walker, Amy Stone, Jennifer N. Langan, Eric T. Hostnik, Amy B. Alexander

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Dental disease is common in captive-managed macropods, including Bennett's wallabies, and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Dental extractions and debridement of diseased tissue is often necessary for those undergoing treatment for severe dental disease. Regional anesthesia of the dentition is considered standard of care for domestic animals undergoing orofacial surgery, however, it is not routinely performed in macropods due to limited information on dental anatomy and block approaches. Regional block descriptions for the infraorbital, maxillary, inferior alveolar, and mental blocks in domestic dogs and cats were evaluated and adapted for use in Bennett's wallabies based on descriptions of their anatomy and examination of 2 skulls. These approaches were then performed on cadaver heads with iohexol and methylene blue dye, and block placement was assessed on computed tomography scans and by gross dissection. All block approaches described in this study resulted in appropriate placement of regional anesthesia of the dentition in Bennett's wallabies. They can thus be used by clinicians to improve the intra and postoperative pain control of patients and provide a high level of veterinary care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Veterinary Dentistry
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • Bennett's wallaby
  • Macropus rufogriseus
  • dental disease
  • macropod
  • regional anesthesia
  • regional blocks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Veterinary

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