Reflecting on aspect-oriented programming, metaprogramming, and adaptive distributed monitoring

Bill Donkervoet, Gul Agha

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Metaprogramming and computational reflection are two related techniques that allow the programmer to change the semantics of a program in a modular fashion. Although the concepts have been explored by researchers for some time, a form of metaprogramming, namely aspect-oriented programming, is now being used by some practitioners. This paper is an attempt to understand the limitations of different forms of computational reflection in concurrent and distributed computing. It specifically studies the use of aspect-oriented programming and reflective actor libraries, and their relation to full reflection. We choose distributed monitoring as the primary example application because its requirements nicely fit the abilities of the two systems as well as illustrate their limitations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
PublisherSpringer
Pages246-265
Number of pages20
ISBN (Print)3540747915, 9783540747918
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Event5th International Symposium on Formal Methods for Components and Objects, FMCO 2006 - Amsterdam, Netherlands
Duration: Nov 7 2006Nov 10 2006

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume4709 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other5th International Symposium on Formal Methods for Components and Objects, FMCO 2006
Country/TerritoryNetherlands
CityAmsterdam
Period11/7/0611/10/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • General Computer Science

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