Recharge and Groundwater Flow Within an Intracratonic Basin, Midwestern United States

Samuel V. Panno, Zohreh Askari, Walton R. Kelly, Thomas M. Parris, Keith C. Hackley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The conservative nature of chloride (Cl) in groundwater and the abundance of geochemical data from various sources (both published and unpublished) provided a means of developing, for the first time, a representation of the hydrogeology of the Illinois Basin on a basin-wide scale. The creation of Cl isocons superimposed on plan view maps of selected formations and on cross sections across the Illinois Basin yielded a conceptual model on a basin-wide scale of recharge into, groundwater flow within and through the Illinois Basin. The maps and cross sections reveal the infiltration and movement of freshwater into the basin and dilution of brines within various geologic strata occurring at basin margins and along geologic structures. Cross-formational movement of brines is also seen in the northern part of the basin. The maps and cross sections also show barriers to groundwater movement created by aquitards resulting in areas of apparent isolation/stagnation of concentrated brines within the basin. The distribution of Cl within the Illinois Basin suggests that the current chemical composition of groundwater and distribution of brines within the basin is dependent on five parameters: (1) presence of bedrock exposures along basin margins; (2) permeability of geologic strata and their distribution relative to one another; (3) presence or absence of major geologic structures; (4) intersection of major waterways with geologic structures, basin margins, and permeable bedrock exposures; and (5) isolation of brines within the basin due to aquitards, inhomogeneous permeability, and, in the case of the deepest part of the basin, brine density effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-45
Number of pages14
JournalGroundWater
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Computers in Earth Sciences

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