Racial differences in the prevalence of antenatal depression

Amelia R. Gavin, Jennifer L. Melville, Tessa Rue, Yuqing Guo, Karen Tabb Dina, Wayne J. Katon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: This study examined whether there were racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence of antenatal depression based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, diagnostic criteria in a community-based sample of pregnant women. Method: Data were drawn from an ongoing registry of pregnant women receiving prenatal care at a university obstetric clinic from January 2004 through March 2010 (N = 1997). Logistic regression models adjusting for sociodemographic, psychiatric, behavioral and clinical characteristics were used to examine racial/ethnic differences in antenatal depression as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire. Results: Overall, 5.1% of the sample reported antenatal depression. Blacks and Asian/Pacific Islanders were at increased risk for antenatal depression compared to non-Hispanic White women. This increased risk of antenatal depression among Blacks and Asian/Pacific Islanders remained after adjustment for a variety of risk factors. Conclusion: Results suggest the importance of race/ethnicity as a risk factor for antenatal depression. Prevention and treatment strategies geared toward the mental health needs of Black and Asian/Pacific Islander women are needed to reduce the racial/ethnic disparities in antenatal depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-93
Number of pages7
JournalGeneral Hospital Psychiatry
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Depression
Pregnant Women
Logistic Models
Prenatal Care
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Obstetrics
Psychiatry
Registries
Mental Health
Health
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Asian/Pacific islander
  • Black
  • Depression
  • Pregnancy
  • Racial disparity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Racial differences in the prevalence of antenatal depression. / Gavin, Amelia R.; Melville, Jennifer L.; Rue, Tessa; Guo, Yuqing; Dina, Karen Tabb; Katon, Wayne J.

In: General Hospital Psychiatry, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.03.2011, p. 87-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gavin, Amelia R. ; Melville, Jennifer L. ; Rue, Tessa ; Guo, Yuqing ; Dina, Karen Tabb ; Katon, Wayne J. / Racial differences in the prevalence of antenatal depression. In: General Hospital Psychiatry. 2011 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 87-93.
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